Happy Thanksgiving from the Moore family

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thor156
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Happy Thanksgiving from the Moore family

Post by thor156 » Wed Nov 24, 2004 9:48 pm

Is anyone preparing turkey tonight? If so, how are you preparing your turkey this thanksgiving? Wally and I decided to go with a high quality burgandy wine, and just baste the heck out of two birds on the smoker grill.. I'll let you know how they turn out

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Post by Reepicheep » Wed Nov 24, 2004 9:56 pm

Last year I made my first thanksgiving turkey, and just followed the instructions from Martha (in her "cooking 101" section).

http://www.marthastewart.com/page.jhtml ... nnel172013

It turned out fabulous. I have never eaten turkey that moist before.
You can play around with the seasonings, however you like, the main idea is to baste the turkey with a cheesecloth that has been soaking in butter and wine. Mmmmmm.
Buster:"Sister is my new mother, Mother..."

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Post by johnc » Wed Nov 24, 2004 10:51 pm

Heck no; I mean, here you witness a man who's been known to burn water. My brother's hosting the family get-together, and he's got a gizmo that deep-fries the turkey. Y'all ever tried one of those? Great eats!

Martha Stewart, eh? That reminded me of a little jewel that had been taking up space on my hard drive. Happy reading...

***

Subject: Fw: Thanksgiving dinner w/o Martha Stewart

I have changed plans this Thanksgiving.......

Martha Stewart will not be dining with us this Thanksgiving. I'm telling you in advance, so don't act surprised. Since Ms. Stewart won't be coming, I've made a few small changes:

Our sidewalk will not be lined with homemade, paper bag luminaries. After a trial run, it was decided that no matter how cleverly done, rows of flaming lunch sacks do not have the desired welcoming effect.

Once inside, our guests will note that the entry hall is not decorated with the swags of Indian corn and fall foliage I had planned to make. Instead, I've gotten the kids involved in the decorating by having them track in colorful autumn leaves from the front yard. The mud was their idea.

The dining table will not be covered with expensive linens, fancy china, or crystal goblets. If possible, we will use dishes that match and everyone will get a fork. Since this IS Thanksgiving, we will refrain from using the plastic Peter Rabbit plate and the Santa napkins from last Christmas. Our centerpiece will not be the tower of fresh fruit and flowers that I promised. Instead we will be displaying a hedgehog-like decoration hand-crafted from the finest construction paper. The artist assures me it is a turkey.

We will be dining fashionably late. The children will entertain you while you wait. I'm sure they will be happy to share every choice comment I have made regarding Thanksgiving, pilgrims, and the turkey hotline. Please remember that most of these comments were made at 5:00 A.M. upon discovering that the turkey was still hard enough to cut diamonds. As accompaniment to the children's recital, I will play a recording of tribal drumming. If the children should mention that I don't own a recording of tribal drumming, or that tribal drumming sounds suspiciously like a frozen turkey in a clothes dryer, ignore them.

We toyed with the idea of ringing a dainty silver bell to announce the start of our feast. In the end, we chose to keep our traditional method. We've also decided against a formal seating arrangement. When the smoke alarm sounds, please gather around the table and sit where you like. In the spirit of harmony, we will ask the children to sit at a separate table. In a separate room. Next door.

Now, I know you have all seen pictures of one person carving a turkey in front of a crowd of appreciative onlookers. This will not be happening at our dinner. For safety reasons, the turkey will be carved in a private ceremony. I stress "private," meaning: Do not, under any circumstances, enter the kitchen to laugh at me. Do not send small, unsuspecting children to check on my progress. I have an electric knife. The turkey is unarmed. It stands to reason that I will eventually win. When I do, we will eat.

I would like to take this opportunity to remind my young diners that "passing the rolls" is not a football play. Nor is it a request to bean your sister in the head with warm tasty bread. Oh, and one reminder for the adults: For the duration of the meal, and especially while in the presence of young diners, we will refer to the giblet gravy by its lesser known name: Cheese Sauce. If a young diner questions you regarding the origins or type of Cheese Sauce, plead ignorance. Cheese Sauce stains.

Before I forget, there is one last change. Instead of offering a choice between 12 different scrumptious desserts, we will be serving the traditional pumpkin pie, garnished with whipped cream and small fingerprints. You will still have a choice: take it or leave it.

Martha Stewart will not be dining with us this Thanksgiving. She probably won't come next year either. I am thankful.
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Post by thor156 » Wed Nov 24, 2004 11:25 pm

I never thought about thawing out a bird withn a clothes dryer. That'll save me loads of time this christmas...

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Post by Sam Gamgee » Thu Nov 25, 2004 12:20 pm

So what do non-Americans think about this holiday? Just curious. I always thought it was rather strange myself...
Workings of man crying out from the fires set aflame
By his blindness to see that the warmth of his being
Is promised for his seeing, his reaching so clearly

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Post by thor156 » Fri Nov 26, 2004 7:25 am

I don't know what "non-Americans" think about Thanksgiving, but I do know that Thanksgiving is the oldest American holiday.

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Post by SuperTed » Fri Nov 26, 2004 9:03 am

Sam Gamgee wrote:So what do non-Americans think about this holiday?
Well, since I work indirectly for Allstate Insurance (ptoo!) it means I get a couple of afternoons with no interminable phone conferences, for which I give many, many thanks! :lol:

Maybe it might be an idea to turn the question around and ask Americans how they perceive the idea of "Thanksgiving"?

P.S. Will Martha use a knife to carve this year's turkey or will she have to use the shiv she traded for 200 Marlboro' with Big Bertha from Cell Block K? :shock: :P
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Post by CanarioAB » Fri Nov 26, 2004 12:00 pm

I know this is a day late, but for future reference most of the cooking shows on the Food Network on Wednesday and Thursday advised AGAINST basting. They said it doesn't make a difference, and the frequent opening of the oven dries out the bird, and lowers the oven temperature, making the bird's cooking time longer! Who knew?

My favorite cooking authority, America's Test Kitchen/Cook's Illustrated, also says this. Again, who knew?

Not that I did any cooking yesterday -- I stopped at Boston Market! :D

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Post by Sam Gamgee » Fri Nov 26, 2004 2:55 pm

Supposedly the day is about giving thanks or something. No, it really isn't. You may or may not know that many people wish each other a "Happy Turkey Day" instead of "Thanksgiving" - more proof that it's really just about the food. Turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberries, and pumpkin pie. Get together with relatives, gorge yourself until you feel like you're going to fall over, and then go doze in front of the TV playing the football game. That's really all there is to it. Hurrah, let's get together as a country and celebrate gluttony! :roll:

(If you haven't picked up, I greatly dislike Thanksgiving. Of course, I've always hated turkey, mashed potatoes, and stuffing. (except for pumpkin pie, which is the best ever) So naturally, if you hate the food, and that's what the day is about, you hate the day.
Workings of man crying out from the fires set aflame
By his blindness to see that the warmth of his being
Is promised for his seeing, his reaching so clearly

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Post by thor156 » Fri Nov 26, 2004 8:32 pm

I think it all began when the pilgrams came over from England to escape oppression and begin a new way of life. The Native Americans showed these new people how to take care of themselves, grow corn and other vegetables, how to catch fish, basically live off the land. So I guess Thanksgiving is the celebration of new friends and family...oh yeah, its a celebration of pumpkin pie too.....

The thing about basting, Ive heard that before but I have had excellent success basting birds on the smoker grill. The secret is a pan of water or wine or even butter in the bottom of the cooking chamber. This puts moisture directly into the food, makes steam ya'know. But the drawback is that it's slow, slow and low (temperature) so dont make plans when smoke cooking caus' it's labor intensive. About 8 hours for a 12 to 15 pound turkey at about 275 degrees....

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Post by CanarioAB » Mon Nov 29, 2004 12:01 pm

I suppose Thanksgiving is what you make it. Some people focus on the food, some on the football, but a lot of people DO in fact give thanks too! For instance, I gave thanks that I could plant my butt on the couch, eat my Boston Market turkey dinner (which was very good), watch the Macy's parade and then all-day football! And hey, I wasn't at work either. All in all, it was a very good day, for which I'm ... thankful :)

No law says you HAVE to eat turkey/stuffing/smashed potatoes/cranberry sauce etc. I suppose you should eat what you like and be thankful for THAT!

What I was NOT thankful for was the small but very vocal minority who hate Thanksgiving and want to outlaw it because you might hear someone utter their thanks to GOD somewhere along the way. It's all really gotten quite silly.


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Post by Elrabin » Mon Nov 29, 2004 5:55 pm

Sam Gamgee wrote:(If you haven't picked up, I greatly dislike Thanksgiving. Of course, I've always hated turkey, mashed potatoes, and stuffing.
Oh, good, and here I thought I was the only person in America that doesn't like Thanksgiving. Now, I don't like pumpkin pie either, so I can't even look forward to dessert. Needless to say, I loaded up on dinner rolls. Yum.

Sure, there is the whole actual thanks giving part of the holiday, but as it happens with most holidays in America, the real meaning of the occasion is often swept under the rug to focus on gobs of food, pretty lights and trees, pretty fireworks, lots of really cool neato things, jellybeans and bunny rabbits, etc., ad nauseam. Not saying that I don't like jellybeans or really cool neato things, but... you know what I mean. Hopefully.
hu ic earmcearig iscealdne sæ
winter wunade wræccan lastum

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the mystery turkey thief

Post by thor156 » Sat Dec 04, 2004 7:38 pm

Well as you know we prepared turkey on the smoke cooker again this thanksgiving. They turned out great, at least one of them did. I have a small refrigerator on the back porch and one of the two birds wound up getting left in there for a couple of days. Wrapped up in foil and everything. One day I realized that the fridge was wide open, the turkey that I forgot about was gone. Best we can figure is that our raccoons must be to blame, there were turkey parts and bones all over the back yard, pieces of foil in two of my neighbors lawns, a sad day for the turkey lovers in my family..:bawling:

So don't leave a fully cooked turkey in a fridge on your back porch caus it might disappear... :lol: :lol: :lol:

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